9 THINGS WE NEVER WOULD HAVE THOUGHT OF EATING 20 YEARS AGO 

The first American to write about tofu might have been Benjamin Franklin in 1770, but it took much longer for the soybean-based curd to gain widespread popularity in the United States.

Tofu

Before kale became a staple in Caesar salads and juice bowls in the early 2010s, the largest consumer of the hearty green was Pizza Hut — as a garnish below ingredient bowls in their salad bars.

Kale

Founded in Italy in 1964, Nutella became a heavily memed foodie phenomenon in the United States around 2009, with sales tripling in the following five years.

Nutella

Kombucha is a fermented tea drink whose Chinese origins date back to around 220 B.C., but it entered American domestic markets only in the mid-'90s, when leading brand GT's Kombucha was founded.

Kombucha

A spike in demand for the nutrient-packed grain, grown almost exclusively in South America, was driven by more than a decade of U.N.-financed development of new processing plants raising the grain's profitability.

Quinoa

Among the most novel of reimagined desserts is rolled ice cream, which is made fresh on a freezing-cold griddle, then rolled up and finished with fresh fruit, chocolate sauce, or other toppings.

Rolled Ice Cream

The number of agave products available more than tripled between 2003 and 2007, thanks in part to public perceptions about its healthfulness.

Agave

Coconut oil saw a burst of popularity beginning in 2011 and peaking with $229 million in sales in 2015, which can be partially attributed to vegan and paleo dietary trends.

Coconut Oil

Before avocado toast became an Instagram cliché, avocados were known as "alligator pears," and import restrictions banned shipments from Mexico into the late '90s.

Avocado

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